How to Write a Novel in 60 Days


Writing a Novel in 60 DaysBudding authors who are interested in writing a novel within a short period of time often underestimate the commitment required to start the writing. It is not impossible to write a novel in 60 days, but it does require making a schedule and sticking to it.

You can write a novel in 60 days if you are prepared to put aside some time each day to work on the book.

Determine Time Available to Write Each Day:

Before starting on the novel, organize your daily schedule and determine if it is even possible for you to set aside enough time to write the novel in a two-month period. A time limit of 60 days is not long, so it is necessary to spend time writing each day. Setting up a schedule that includes a few hours of writing will help reach the goal of completing the novel in 60 days.

The amount of time each day can vary based on life factors. For example, it might be possible to dedicate four or five hours on weekend days to writing, but weekday time constraints might result in only one or two hours, if, for example, you have a full-time job and/or family to take care of. An organized schedule helps ensure that some time is available, even on days that have a tighter schedule.

Set a Realistic Goal:

Setting a realistic goal relates to the number of pages the novel will end up within a 60 day period. A realistic goal might range from writing a 250 to 300-page novel within 60 days. In most cases, an 800 page epic fantasy is not possible to write in only two months.

The best way to set a realistic goal is by determining the number of pages that it is possible for you to write within each hour of writing. For example, someone who writes for two hours per day and can complete two pages per hour will end up writing four pages per day. This means the novel will end up being 240 pages by the end of 60 days.

Setting a realistic goal helps reduce the stress of writing the novel. So, as mentioned, such goals should consider factors like writing speed and the number of hours available to work on the novel.

Organize the Story:

Organizing the story depends on personality and preferred methods of organizing the information. For example, some individuals might spend a day or two outlining the plot and determining the basic storyline, while others will do nothing more than jot down a few story ideas in a sentence or paragraph and work from there.

Write the Novel:

The final part of writing a novel in 60 days is to actually sit down and write the book. In some cases, the rough draft is simply written from an idea while other novelists will use an outline to clearly convey the story.

Remember to leave time after you have written your first draft to re-read your book from start to finish and edit it, as you deem necessary.

Writing a novel does not have to mean spending months or years to complete the story. Instead, it is possible to write the novel within 60 days by getting organized, setting realistic goals and spending time on the novel every day.


Useful resources:

Setting goals
Designing an effective schedule

Filed in: Planning Your Book

2 Responses to “How to Write a Novel in 60 Days”

  1. Tracey P
    November 15, 2012 at 9:58 am #

    These tips are so helpful. The thought of writing a whole book is so daunting to me but if I just sit down and write a bit each day the numbers of pages completed really starts to add up fast! I’m excited to get finished and start editing – hopefully it won’t be a whole pile of crap when I’m done! Keep up the great tips!

    • Melissa Contreras
      November 17, 2012 at 7:00 pm #

      Hi Tracey! I’m glad you found this article useful.

      As with any goal, you have to break it down into smaller tasks. The bigger the goal, the more important it is to do this so you do not feel overwhelmed.

      So, if your goal is to write a novel, then establish a number of words you want to write each day (or, number of scenes, chapters, or however you want to organize yourself) and make a commitment to doing it.

      Hey! If it’s a “pile of crap”, as you say, that’s what the editing process is for! ;)

      Good luck!

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